• RE: The Outlaw State

    @shitshitshit Good writing for once. Getting fatigued here looking at Tweeter pastes and poor writing everywhere else these days.

    posted in Blogs
  • RE: The Outlaw State

    @woodman indeed, four a second I thought this was a cut and paste from the web. Congrats for your writing talents and ability to put elements together.

    posted in Blogs
  • Tire Tips

    Here's a few important things you should know when purchasing new tires. Make sure they are the correct size for your vehicle. This information should be on the door jamb on the driver’s side and in the owners manual.

    0_1532378592070_59b17aae-4d86-4675-8d9f-0ed42486c504-image.png

    One of the most important things that is often overlooked is when the tire was manufactured. Try to get all tires manufactured within a few months, or the same year. You wouldn’t want to purchase 3 new tires that are a few months old and one that is 4 years old when replacing all 4 tires. It may start to dry rot in a couple of years.

    0_1532378653014_c99003e9-acf6-4b11-bb9e-b8f611b6c36a-image.png
    (this tire was made in the 10th week of 2016)

    I recommend purchasing the lifetime balancing, rotating and alignment if you plan on keeping the vehicle for many years. It will pay off in the long run.
    Here’s a few tips to get the most performance and longevity out of your tires.

    1. Rotate tires every 5,000-7,000 miles. This will help tires wear at the same time.
    2. Always put new tires on the back axle. It will help drivers keep control of their cars on wet roads. It doesn't matter if you're driving front-wheel drive, rear-wheel drive, or all-wheel drive. If you lose traction in the rear first, the car's going spin. Physics always wins.
    3. Keep tire pressure at the recommended level. Low tire pressure can cause tires to lose their grip on wet, rainy surfaces. How much pressure do your tires need? Look for the number in your car owner's manual or on your car door.
    4. Check tire pressure on a regular basis. Check the pressure at least once each month.
    5. Check tire tread depth regularly. This will help keep good traction on wet roads. An easy way to check tread depth is to use a quarter inserted upside down into the tire groove: If you can see above Washington's head, start shopping for new tires.
    6. Get the alignment checked at least once per year, or after you’ve hit a curb or a large pothole. An alignment that’s out of tolerance will wear out tires faster. Misalignment is the major cause of tire wear.
    7. Check your spare tire. Often never remembered is the spare tire. Check it every so often.
    8. Car jack. Do you have one? Do you know where it is? Do you know how to use it? Is it the correct jack for your car? Might be a good idea to check.

    0_1532378707574_85cf97af-f9cb-4abb-af27-1c0954a89789-image.png

    Stay Frosty!

    ~ Drive Defensively ~

    posted in Blogs
  • Oil is in the Sweet Spot - Operators open their Wallets

    This week we seen the Trump and Putin summit unfold which made waves across all spectrums of dimension.

    Heres my Ball

    One of the things they discussed was how the oil price was favorable. This clearly puts some common interest across all oil producing nations, and sprinkles some insight on what is to come.

    There is speculation that this is a priming of the pump of sorts - to float Aramco on a American exchange. Which valued market cap is north of $1 Trillion (USD). This liquidity event would mop up a lot of capital around the world. The investment bankers make out like bandits.

    Other buzz around the Tech business space tells a more rosy story of oil execs loosening the wallets and spending more lavishly on CapEx. Which means at current levels of roughly $70/barrel ($45/barrel 1 year ago) there is enough profit to reinvest in the business in the form of new hardware and software.

    The speculation is once oil hits around $100 a barrel, approximately 12-18 months, Aramco will get listed. Who knows if this is accurate, those are the feelings on the streets. The Trump and Putin meeting gave insight on what is important. That sweet, sweet crude.

    posted in Blogs
  • RE: The Outlaw State

    @b_ Very good and nicely written. I enjoyed reading this. Thank you!

    posted in Blogs
  • The Outlaw State

    A kitchen light is thrown on. A roach scurries toward darkness, pauses, composes itself, and issues a confident statement explaining it was in no way seeking shelter, nor darkness. It just didn't want to detract from the mission, or something.

    The roach, Matt Rivitz, a San Francisco lefty and founder of Sleeping Giants, an "anonymous leftist group that organizes social media mobs in an effort to silence conservative voices." (Breitbart)

    The DailyCaller smoked him out with some social media sleuthing.

    "The founder of Sleeping Giants, a left-wing activist group that has targeted right-wing voices with boycott campaigns, has managed to keep his identity a secret, even as his own group has become a major political player among liberals. Until now."

    Breitbart: "The group’s modus operandi is consistent throughout its campaigns: use social media in cooperation with other well-funded left-wing groups like Media Matters for America and Think Progress to urge their followers to contact advertisers en masse – expressing their outrage that companies dare advertise with conservatives."
    ...

    "More recently, the group joined with teenage anti-gun rights campaigner David Hogg to try to push conservative icon Laura Ingraham off the FM airwaves and cable news."

    The new New Left: wealthy, connected, establishment; hostile to all things nationalist and populist. In love with its money and status, hostile to all things potentially antithetical to its voracious appetite, and using its social justice virtue signalling and identity grievance politics as a blunt instrument to pummel its social inferiors in the general citizenry, with their banal focus on law, order, jobs and community and identity.

    The Rivitz saga is one facet of a many sided face, only partially unmasked, which undermines the law and the public will through the machinations of substate and overstate actors connected with the real power operative in America.


    The structure of power in the Anglo-American model involves a two facedness: the formal constitution, a set of de jure law, and a structure of private power, the de facto, behind the curtain law.

    Changing the formal law is an onerous process, and changing the constitution near impossible.

    But the wheels of commerce need to go on turning, and so the powers that be, those informal structures of power behind the curtain, have devised clever work-arounds when the public, formal processes and bodies of elected representatives prove recalcitrant and unruly to pressure and propaganda.

    The first amendment to the US constitution is the freedom to speak and assemble. This right is still on the books in America, at least. So, how flout the spirit of the law, without violating the letter?

    Enter Antifa, Black Lives Matter, and the #Resist Crowd. Allow the lawless goons and thugs in the employ of these organizations to run riot in the midst of legal gatherings of Americans intent on exercising their freedom of expression. Don't disperse them or prosecute them formally, in the law courts and the court of public opinion, but via the backdoor of mundane violence and intimidation tactics.

    Simply permit these private, substate actors to behave as de facto enforcers for the private state, the informal power structure, composed of financial interests, lawyers, lobbyists, shareholders, bureaucrats, intelligence operatives, and sundry intellectuals and journalists of our runaway regime.

    You want to speak and assemble for or against some formal measure? Good for you. That is your democratic right, on paper. But are you willing to bear the burden of violence, arrest, or jail if some bat wielding, masked psychopath attacks you on orders from above?

    It is not so different for you than for the booked arrestee, faced with conviction of some petty crime, armed with an inept public defender, or a plea bargain that guarantees a light sentence for a crime perhaps never committed. You have options, but are they really options?

    There are laws regulating the entry of people into our country. It is the duty of the executive branch to execute these laws as written. The failure to do so, and the failure to penalize localities which refuse to cooperate in doing so, renders such laws null and void. Voila! a breach of the whole idea of law, under the guise of humanity and compassion, as portrayed by our unelected media.

    Tax laws exist on the books to fund the government. They fall hardest on those unable to skirt the laws through the methods of clever attorneys and accountants hired for the purpose. One such method is to create a fake country and government somewhere outside the territorial jurisdiction of a western country, yet protected by its military and courts, and allow corporations to operate there in a financial sense. Though outside the formal jurisdiction of law and taxation, these territories exist under the military umbrella of the western powers, and these businesses feel free of any external threat from real world powers, or even mere pirates. They free ride on implicit protection while cheating on their obligations to the body politic that protects them. It is a roundabout way of collecting a sort of tribute from the taxpaying class.

    The same is true of the outsourced capital operating in countries that could be easily invaded and occupied, the factories and intellectual property seized, without implicit American protection. The profits that flow from the cheap labor of these factories, the skirted wages, taxes, regulatory costs, etc., operate on the backs of an implicit protection from external seizure by neighboring regimes.

    This arrangement relies upon the social engineering of masses of voters, who themselves benefit little from empire, or even imagine themselves as participants in an empire. So it is that they, when propositioned with war to defend some business interest, need a moral justification for the war that is amoral. War propaganda, spoonfed by private media working hand in glove with the state, create the black propaganda that feeds a war spirit, and requires extra punitive and extra lengthy entanglements in conflicts that if fought formally on the basis of mere economic interest could be wrapped up quickly. This little glitch offers irresistible charm to the American arms industry.

    On the flipside, the bottom half of taxpayers appear on the surface to pay very little in taxes for the maintenance of the state, and this figures in the political talking points. Yet, by its permitting rampant usury and financial fraud in finance, real estate and insurance, medical care and higher education, the regular citizen is raked over the coals to feed the private coffers of private organizations, who then fill the political campaign coffers of the politicians and offer them lucrative places on their boards of directors, after their term of service in the formal state expires.

    Fees, interest payments and so on stand in for traditional taxes and flow from poor and middle to rich in exchange for "financial services" that are more or less unearned rents.

    The monetization of natural resources; loans to foreign states, enforced on the back end by American arms if they dare default; the conversion of land values into mortgages, all represent a gigantic flow of labor and money from average citizens to elite capital that should be flowing to the public good, or else left in the people's pockets.

    Bailouts after an orgy of speculation on the credit of the public function similarly, as do federally guaranteed loans that earn hefty interest with no risk of default (student debt).

    The provision of state subsidies to poorly paid workers is another shift from the taxpayer to the free riding private state that runs its squeeze on the average citizen, in that it absolves these corporations of the need to pay adequate wages, and nips any nascent labor organization in the bud. The service economy lives and breathes of state welfare.

    Finally, when the people actually make their will manifest through laws and elections, the supreme court can be relied upon to overturn whatever the other branches of government allow to slip through, overruling the public will by judicial fiat. The whole apparatus closes ranks to take down enemy politicians, called "demogauges," and strongmen. Trump is not the last.

    The running of covert, proxy wars outside the purview of Congress, the collection of intelligence on Americans through exchange with foreign agencies, or the use of the private tech sector giants for same -- all these employ outside surrogates to circumvent the law as written and violate the rights of citizens enshrined in the formal law, and the trust implied in law.

    It is what the state does not do, what it encourages and what it fails to prohibit, that matters as much or more so than what it does overtly. As in Bastiat, the unseen is more important than the seen.

    posted in Blogs
  • RE: Does Organic really mean "Organic"?

    organic will never be 100% in our lifetimes, we've contaminated the agriculture far too much. I recall USDA using a 99% or 95%...or 90% label or whatever the number is now to help quantify the poison we're obligated to put into our bodies.

    posted in Blogs
  • RE: Does Organic really mean "Organic"?

    I went cross eyed reading this.

    posted in Blogs
  • Does Organic really mean "Organic"?

    Your organic food is treated with pesticides too.

    So, will you lower your pesticide exposure by switching to organic? We don’t know, but the answer may very well be no. Even looking at the synthetic, non-organic pesticides in the USDA’s tests, conventional crops don’t always have the lowest amounts. Take strawberries, for example, the “dirtiest” item on the 2018 list: 75 percent of organic strawberries, and 76 percent of conventional strawberries, had pesticide levels that were under 5 percent of the allowable levels.
    0_1523646926216_strawberry.jpg

    You will see near the bottom of this article that non-organic products are allowed in "organic" products.

    §205.601 Synthetic substances allowed for use in organic crop production.
    In accordance with restrictions specified in this section, the following synthetic substances may be used in organic crop production: Provided, That, use of such substances do not contribute to contamination of crops, soil, or water. Substances allowed by this section, except disinfectants and sanitizers in paragraph (a) and those substances in paragraphs (c), (j), (k), and (l) of this section, may only be used when the provisions set forth in

    (a) As algicide, disinfectants, and sanitizer, including irrigation system cleaning systems.

    (1) Alcohols.

    (i) Ethanol.

    (ii) Isopropanol.

    (2) Chlorine materials—For pre-harvest use, residual chlorine levels in the water in direct crop contact or as water from cleaning irrigation systems applied to soil must not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act, except that chlorine products may be used in edible sprout production according to EPA label directions.

    (i) Calcium hypochlorite.

    (ii) Chlorine dioxide.

    (iii) Sodium hypochlorite.

    (3) Copper sulfate—for use as an algicide in aquatic rice systems, is limited to one application per field during any 24-month period. Application rates are limited to those which do not increase baseline soil test values for copper over a timeframe agreed upon by the producer and accredited certifying agent.

    (4) Hydrogen peroxide.

    (5) Ozone gas—for use as an irrigation system cleaner only.

    (6) Peracetic acid—for use in disinfecting equipment, seed, and asexually propagated planting material. Also permitted in hydrogen peroxide formulations as allowed in §205.601(a) at concentration of no more than 6% as indicated on the pesticide product label.

    (7) Soap-based algicide/demossers.

    (8) Sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate (CAS #-15630-89-4)—Federal law restricts the use of this substance in food crop production to approved food uses identified on the product label.

    (b) As herbicides, weed barriers, as applicable.

    (1) Herbicides, soap-based—for use in farmstead maintenance (roadways, ditches, right of ways, building perimeters) and ornamental crops.

    (2) Mulches.

    (i) Newspaper or other recycled paper, without glossy or colored inks.

    (ii) Plastic mulch and covers (petroleum-based other than polyvinyl chloride (PVC)).

    (iii) Biodegradable biobased mulch film as defined in §205.2. Must be produced without organisms or feedstock derived from excluded methods.

    (c) As compost feedstocks—Newspapers or other recycled paper, without glossy or colored inks.

    (d) As animal repellents—Soaps, ammonium—for use as a large animal repellant only, no contact with soil or edible portion of crop.

    (e) As insecticides (including acaricides or mite control).

    (1) Ammonium carbonate—for use as bait in insect traps only, no direct contact with crop or soil.

    (2) Aqueous potassium silicate (CAS #-1312-76-1)—the silica, used in the manufacture of potassium silicate, must be sourced from naturally occurring sand.

    (3) Boric acid—structural pest control, no direct contact with organic food or crops.

    (4) Copper sulfate—for use as tadpole shrimp control in aquatic rice production, is limited to one application per field during any 24-month period. Application rates are limited to levels which do not increase baseline soil test values for copper over a timeframe agreed upon by the producer and accredited certifying agent.

    (5) Elemental sulfur.

    (6) Lime sulfur—including calcium polysulfide.

    (7) Oils, horticultural—narrow range oils as dormant, suffocating, and summer oils.

    (8) Soaps, insecticidal.

    (9) Sticky traps/barriers.

    (10) Sucrose octanoate esters (CAS #s—42922-74-7; 58064-47-4)—in accordance with approved labeling.

    (f) As insect management. Pheromones.

    (g) As rodenticides. Vitamin D3.

    (h) As slug or snail bait. Ferric phosphate (CAS # 10045-86-0).

    (i) As plant disease control.

    (1) Aqueous potassium silicate (CAS #-1312-76-1)—the silica, used in the manufacture of potassium silicate, must be sourced from naturally occurring sand.

    (2) Coppers, fixed—copper hydroxide, copper oxide, copper oxychloride, includes products exempted from EPA tolerance, Provided, That, copper-based materials must be used in a manner that minimizes accumulation in the soil and shall not be used as herbicides.

    (3) Copper sulfate—Substance must be used in a manner that minimizes accumulation of copper in the soil.

    (4) Hydrated lime.

    (5) Hydrogen peroxide.

    (6) Lime sulfur.

    (7) Oils, horticultural, narrow range oils as dormant, suffocating, and summer oils.

    (8) Peracetic acid—for use to control fire blight bacteria. Also permitted in hydrogen peroxide formulations as allowed in §205.601(i) at concentration of no more than 6% as indicated on the pesticide product label.

    (9) Potassium bicarbonate.

    (10) Elemental sulfur.

    (j) As plant or soil amendments.

    (1) Aquatic plant extracts (other than hydrolyzed)—Extraction process is limited to the use of potassium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide; solvent amount used is limited to that amount necessary for extraction.

    (2) Elemental sulfur.

    (3) Humic acids—naturally occurring deposits, water and alkali extracts only.

    (4) Lignin sulfonate—chelating agent, dust suppressant.

    (5) Magnesium sulfate—allowed with a documented soil deficiency.

    (6) Micronutrients—not to be used as a defoliant, herbicide, or desiccant. Those made from nitrates or chlorides are not allowed. Soil deficiency must be documented by testing.

    (i) Soluble boron products.

    (ii) Sulfates, carbonates, oxides, or silicates of zinc, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and cobalt.

    (7) Liquid fish products—can be pH adjusted with sulfuric, citric or phosphoric acid. The amount of acid used shall not exceed the minimum needed to lower the pH to 3.5.

    (8) Vitamins, B1, C, and E.

    (9) Sulfurous acid (CAS # 7782-99-2) for on-farm generation of substance utilizing 99% purity elemental sulfur per paragraph (j)(2) of this section.

    (k) As plant growth regulators. Ethylene gas—for regulation of pineapple flowering.

    (l) As floating agents in post harvest handling. Sodium silicate—for tree fruit and fiber processing.

    (m) As synthetic inert ingredients as classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for use with nonsynthetic substances or synthetic substances listed in this section and used as an active pesticide ingredient in accordance with any limitations on the use of such substances.

    (1) EPA List 4—Inerts of Minimal Concern.

    (2) EPA List 3—Inerts of unknown toxicity—for use only in passive pheromone dispensers.

    (n) Seed preparations. Hydrogen chloride (CAS # 7647-01-0)—for delinting cotton seed for planting.

    (o) As production aids. Microcrystalline cheesewax (CAS #'s 64742-42-3, 8009-03-08, and 8002-74-2)-for use in log grown mushroom production. Must be made without either ethylene-propylene co-polymer or synthetic colors.

    §205.603 Synthetic substances allowed for use in organic livestock production.

    In accordance with restrictions specified in this section the following synthetic substances may be used in organic livestock production:

    (a) As disinfectants, sanitizer, and medical treatments as applicable.

    (1) Alcohols.

    (i) Ethanol-disinfectant and sanitizer only, prohibited as a feed additive.

    (ii) Isopropanol-disinfectant only.

    (2) Aspirin-approved for health care use to reduce inflammation.

    (3) Atropine (CAS #-51-55-8)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires:

    (i) Use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian; and

    (ii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 56 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 12 days after administering to dairy animals.

    (4) Biologics—Vaccines.

    (5) Butorphanol (CAS #-42408-82-2)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires:

    (i) Use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian; and

    (ii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 42 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 8 days after administering to dairy animals.

    (6) Chlorhexidine—Allowed for surgical procedures conducted by a veterinarian. Allowed for use as a teat dip when alternative germicidal agents and/or physical barriers have lost their effectiveness.

    (7) Chlorine materials—disinfecting and sanitizing facilities and equipment. Residual chlorine levels in the water shall not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

    (i) Calcium hypochlorite.

    (ii) Chlorine dioxide.

    (iii) Sodium hypochlorite.

    (8) Electrolytes—without antibiotics.

    (9) Flunixin (CAS #-38677-85-9)—in accordance with approved labeling; except that for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires a withdrawal period of at least two-times that required by the FDA.

    (10) Glucose.

    (11) Glycerin—Allowed as a livestock teat dip, must be produced through the hydrolysis of fats or oils.

    (12) Hydrogen peroxide.

    (13) Iodine.

    (14) Magnesium hydroxide (CAS #-1309-42-8)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian.

    (15) Magnesium sulfate.

    (16) Oxytocin—use in postparturition therapeutic applications.

    (17) Parasiticides—Prohibited in slaughter stock, allowed in emergency treatment for dairy and breeder stock when organic system plan-approved preventive management does not prevent infestation. Milk or milk products from a treated animal cannot be labeled as provided for in subpart D of this part for 90 days following treatment. In breeder stock, treatment cannot occur during the last third of gestation if the progeny will be sold as organic and must not be used during the lactation period for breeding stock.

    (i) Fenbendazole (CAS #43210-67-9)—only for use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian.

    (ii) Ivermectin (CAS #70288-86-7).

    (iii) Moxidectin (CAS #113507-06-5)—for control of internal parasites only.

    (18) Peroxyacetic/peracetic acid (CAS #-79-21-0)—for sanitizing facility and processing equipment.

    (19) Phosphoric acid—allowed as an equipment cleaner, Provided, That, no direct contact with organically managed livestock or land occurs.

    (20) Poloxalene (CAS #-9003-11-6)—for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires that poloxalene only be used for the emergency treatment of bloat.

    (21) Tolazoline (CAS #-59-98-3)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires:

    (i) Use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian;

    (ii) Use only to reverse the effects of sedation and analgesia caused by Xylazine; and

    (iii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 8 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 4 days after administering to dairy animals.

    (22) Xylazine (CAS #-7361-61-7)—federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the lawful written or oral order of a licensed veterinarian, in full compliance with the AMDUCA and 21 CFR part 530 of the Food and Drug Administration regulations. Also, for use under 7 CFR part 205, the NOP requires:

    (i) Use by or on the lawful written order of a licensed veterinarian;

    (ii) The existence of an emergency; and

    (iii) A meat withdrawal period of at least 8 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter; and a milk discard period of at least 4 days after administering to dairy animals.

    (b) As topical treatment, external parasiticide or local anesthetic as applicable.

    (1) Copper sulfate.

    (2) Formic acid (CAS # 64-18-6)—for use as a pesticide solely within honeybee hives.

    (3) Iodine.

    (4) Lidocaine—as a local anesthetic. Use requires a withdrawal period of 90 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter and 7 days after administering to dairy animals.

    (5) Lime, hydrated—as an external pest control, not permitted to cauterize physical alterations or deodorize animal wastes.

    (6) Mineral oil—for topical use and as a lubricant.

    (7) Procaine—as a local anesthetic, use requires a withdrawal period of 90 days after administering to livestock intended for slaughter and 7 days after administering to dairy animals.

    (8) Sucrose octanoate esters (CAS #s-42922-74-7; 58064-47-4)—in accordance with approved labeling.

    (c) As feed supplements—None.

    (d) As feed additives.

    (1) DL-Methionine, DL-Methionine-hydroxy analog, and DL-Methionine-hydroxy analog calcium (CAS #'s 59-51-8, 583-91-5, 4857-44-7, and 922-50-9)—for use only in organic poultry production at the following maximum levels of synthetic methionine per ton of feed: Laying and broiler chickens—2 pounds; turkeys and all other poultry—3 pounds.

    (2) Trace minerals, used for enrichment or fortification when FDA approved.

    (3) Vitamins, used for enrichment or fortification when FDA approved.

    (e) As synthetic inert ingredients as classified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for use with nonsynthetic substances or synthetic substances listed in this section and used as an active pesticide ingredient in accordance with any limitations on the use of such substances.

    (1) EPA List 4—Inerts of Minimal Concern.

    (2) [Reserved]

    (f) Excipients, only for use in the manufacture of drugs used to treat organic livestock when the excipient is: Identified by the FDA as Generally Recognized As Safe; Approved by the FDA as a food additive; or Included in the FDA review and approval of a New Animal Drug Application or New Drug Application.

    §205.605 Nonagricultural (nonorganic) substances allowed as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as “organic” or “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s)).”

    The following nonagricultural substances may be used as ingredients in or on processed products labeled as “organic” or “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s))” only in accordance with any restrictions specified in this section.

    (a) Nonsynthetics allowed:

    Acids (Alginic; Citric—produced by microbial fermentation of carbohydrate substances; and Lactic).

    Agar-agar.

    Animal enzymes—(Rennet—animals derived; Catalase—bovine liver; Animal lipase; Pancreatin; Pepsin; and Trypsin).

    Attapulgite—as a processing aid in the handling of plant and animal oils.

    Bentonite.

    Calcium carbonate.

    Calcium chloride.

    Calcium sulfate—mined.

    Carrageenan.

    Dairy cultures.

    Diatomaceous earth—food filtering aid only.

    Enzymes—must be derived from edible, nontoxic plants, nonpathogenic fungi, or nonpathogenic bacteria.

    Flavors, nonsynthetic sources only and must not be produced using synthetic solvents and carrier systems or any artificial preservative.

    Gellan gum (CAS # 71010-52-1)—high-acyl form only.

    Glucono delta-lactone—production by the oxidation of D-glucose with bromine water is prohibited.

    Kaolin.

    L-Malic acid (CAS # 97-67-6).

    Magnesium sulfate, nonsynthetic sources only.

    Microorganisms—any food grade bacteria, fungi, and other microorganism.

    Nitrogen—oil-free grades.

    Oxygen—oil-free grades.

    Perlite—for use only as a filter aid in food processing.

    Potassium chloride.

    Potassium iodide.

    Sodium bicarbonate.

    Sodium carbonate.

    Tartaric acid—made from grape wine.

    Waxes—nonsynthetic (Carnauba wax; and Wood resin).

    Yeast—When used as food or a fermentation agent in products labeled as “organic,” yeast must be organic if its end use is for human consumption; nonorganic yeast may be used when organic yeast is not commercially available. Growth on petrochemical substrate and sulfite waste liquor is prohibited. For smoked yeast, nonsynthetic smoke flavoring process must be documented.

    (b) Synthetics allowed:

    Acidified sodium chlorite—Secondary direct antimicrobial food treatment and indirect food contact surface sanitizing. Acidified with citric acid only.

    Activated charcoal (CAS #s 7440-44-0; 64365-11-3)—only from vegetative sources; for use only as a filtering aid.

    Alginates.

    Ammonium bicarbonate—for use only as a leavening agent.

    Ammonium carbonate—for use only as a leavening agent.

    Ascorbic acid.

    Calcium citrate.

    Calcium hydroxide.

    Calcium phosphates (monobasic, dibasic, and tribasic).

    Carbon dioxide.

    Cellulose—for use in regenerative casings, as an anti-caking agent (non-chlorine bleached) and filtering aid.

    Chlorine materials—disinfecting and sanitizing food contact surfaces, Except, That, residual chlorine levels in the water shall not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act (Calcium hypochlorite; Chlorine dioxide; and Sodium hypochlorite).

    Ethylene—allowed for postharvest ripening of tropical fruit and degreening of citrus.

    Ferrous sulfate—for iron enrichment or fortification of foods when required by regulation or recommended (independent organization).

    Glycerides (mono and di)—for use only in drum drying of food.

    Glycerin—produced by hydrolysis of fats and oils.

    Hydrogen peroxide.

    Magnesium chloride—derived from sea water.

    Magnesium stearate—for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”.

    Nutrient vitamins and minerals, in accordance with 21 CFR 104.20, Nutritional Quality Guidelines For Foods.

    Ozone.

    Peracetic acid/Peroxyacetic acid (CAS # 79-21-0)—for use in wash and/or rinse water according to FDA limitations. For use as a sanitizer on food contact surfaces.

    Phosphoric acid—cleaning of food-contact surfaces and equipment only.

    Potassium acid tartrate.

    Potassium carbonate.

    Potassium citrate.

    Potassium hydroxide—prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables except when used for peeling peaches.

    Potassium phosphate—for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specific ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”.

    Silicon dioxide—Permitted as a defoamer. Allowed for other uses when organic rice hulls are not commercially available.

    Sodium acid pyrophosphate (CAS # 7758-16-9)—for use only as a leavening agent.

    Sodium citrate.

    Sodium hydroxide—prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables.

    Sodium phosphates—for use only in dairy foods.

    Sulfur dioxide—for use only in wine labeled “made with organic grapes,” Provided, That, total sulfite concentration does not exceed 100 ppm.

    Tocopherols—derived from vegetable oil when rosemary extracts are not a suitable alternative.

    Xanthan gum.

    This list goes on for many of pages...
    https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&SID=9874504b6f1025eb0e6b67cadf9d3b40&rgn=div6&view=text&node=7:3.1.1.9.32.7&idno=7

    q

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